governmentchemist


New EU method for PAHs in tyre extender oils proposed by Nick Boley
May 29, 2014, 08:13
Filed under: EU Regulation/Legislation, REACH/CLP | Tags: , , ,

The European Commission has notified the World Trade Organisation that it plans to amend Annex XVII of REACH to include a standard analytical method for the restriction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The method should be used to determine the PAH content of extender oils used in the production of tyres or parts of tyres to ensure compliance with the Regulation as defined in the current restriction.

The new reference analytical method is European standard EN 16143:2013, which replaces the IP method IP-346 which will now be removed from the restriction. The IP method was not considered suitable for all sample types which may need to be analysed.

The current limit for PAHs in extender oils is 1 mg/kg for benzo(a)pyrene or 1o mg/kg total of the 8 named individual PAHs (benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(j)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene.

The new standard method involves a double liquid chromatography (LC) clean-up stage and quantitation of the individual PAHs by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Correlation of this type of procedure with IP-346 (on sample matrices where it works well) has been good and, although the new CEN method is more expensive to use, it is more applicable and will give better results across the range of matrices which will be encountered. This makes it a far more suitable procedure for enforcement and monitoring of the regulation.

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